Brew Day — American IPA, 3 Hops, 2 Yeasts, 1 Wort

American IPA split between two yeasts

I recently brewed a batch of beer with .  I had used this beer in my British yeast experiment, and I thought it may make a nice “clean” beer yeast.  Now, I was drinking this compared to 4 other very flavorful yeasts, so my perceptions could have been skewed.  I had also seen how much a yeast can either accent or suppress hop expression, and according to White Labs, WLP 028 is not supposed to suppress the hops like many British strains do.   So, I set up a side by side, where the same IPA will be fermented with WLP 028, and , pretty much the gold standard of clean ale yeasts.

The other piece to this is that I wanted to try some different hop combinations.  Specifically, I wanted to get away from tons of super fruity and citrusy hops such as Cascade, Simcoe, Sorachi and Centennial.  Instead, I was looking for the more herbal, and darker tasting hops, something with some resin, but did not smell too much like marmalade.  I picked out Chinook for its piney notes, Nugget for its more savory/herbal notes, and Columbus, which when I first smelled it, seemed to have quite a bit of spearmint to go with some lighter citrus.  I have used Nugget in the past as a bittering hop, but not much for flavor and aroma, and I have never used Chinook or Columbus before.  I also decided to add these hops in a rotating fashion throughout the brew, hoping to layer the flavors.  I also wanted to focus more on later hop additions to get more taste and aroma from the hops and less bitterness.  I additionally wanted to avoid dryhopping, just to see how much hop aroma I could get, and also because I am going to bottle condition these, so I know I am going to lose some of that bright flavor and aroma anyway.  Instead I chose to add the last addition during whirlpool at 180F.

Finally, I have very soft water.  I usually don’t do to much to my water other then dechlorinate it with campden tablets, but I did add 4g of gypsum to the boil to get some sulfites in the beer, giving me 87ppm.

The recipe is as follows:

9.00 lb       Pale Malt  (Canadian Malting 2 row)        72.00 %
2.00 lb       Vienna Malt (3.5 SRM)                          16.00 %
1.00 lb       Wheat Malt, Ger (Best Maltz)                 8.00 %
0.50 lb       Simpson’s Medium Crystal Malt           4.00 %
0.25 oz       Columbus (Tomahawk) [14.00 %]  (60 min)   Hops         11.1 IBU
0.25 oz       Nugget [12.20 %]  (50 min)                Hops         9.2 IBU
0.25 oz       Chinook [13.00 %]  (40 min)               Hops         9.1 IBU
0.33 oz       Columbus (Tomahawk) [14.00 %]  (30 min)   Hops         11.3 IBU
0.33 oz       Nugget [12.20 %]  (20 min)                Hops         7.8 IBU
0.33 oz       Chinook [13.00 %]  (10 min)               Hops         5.0 IBU
0.42 oz       Nugget [12.20 %]  (0 min) (Steep Hops/Whirlpool)
0.42 oz       Chinook [13.00 %]  (0 min) (Steep Hops/Whirlpool)
0.42 oz       Columbus (Tomahawk) [14.00 %]  (0 min) (Steep Hops/Whirlpool)

The beer was mashed via an infusion at 153F.  The temp dropped to 150 before I corrected my HERM’s system and was able to bring it back up to 154F and hold it for 60 minutes.  I then mashed out at 166F.  This is my second batch with the HERM’s unit, still getting the hang of it.  The OG is 1.061.  The beer has 53.5 IBU’s with a IBU:OG ration of 0.924.  The beer was split into 2 batches, 2.5 gallons each.  I had made 1L starters of both the WLP 028 and the Wyeast 1056, and I decanted and pitched them both.  As I don’t have 2 temperature control systems for fermentation, I am going to let these guys sit next to each other in a closet in my house, which is 67F currently.

Tasting results are here.

2 Responses

  1. Curious to hear what your thoughts were on the final beers. Did 028 work in the IPA?

    • I posted the tasting notes. Can’t find my picutures and got pulled on other projects, but the gist is on the post. Hope this helps.

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