Comments for Grain & Grain http://grainandgrain.com Wood, Wort, and Other Amusements Sun, 07 Apr 2013 13:06:56 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.com/ Comment on Lambic #3 — Brew Day by John http://grainandgrain.com/2012/01/02/lambic-3-brew-day/#comment-381 Sun, 07 Apr 2013 13:06:56 +0000 http://grainandgrain.com/?p=747#comment-381 Nigel,

Honestly, I have not gotten to bottling it off. I have so much else going on right now, I just have not been able to get to it. I will say that I have tasted hydrometer samples, and it was down to 1.005 in about 6 months. It is intensely sour, likely from the culture more than anything else. I have repitched this lambic blend several times, and it is becoming a bit unbalanced. I will likely use some fresh yeast for the next batch, and add some of this culture about a week into it next time to tame that. I also need to brew a clean beer to blend this back. I have been eyeing some saisons that I want to brew in the near future, and I think about 1 gallon of this mixed in a keg with some fresh saison maybe a great beer for the summertime.

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Comment on Lambic #3 — Brew Day by nigel http://grainandgrain.com/2012/01/02/lambic-3-brew-day/#comment-380 Sat, 06 Apr 2013 21:29:12 +0000 http://grainandgrain.com/?p=747#comment-380 How did #lambic 3 turn out with the flaked wheat process compared to #2 mini mash adjunct?

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Comment on Touch of Funk Dry Stout by John http://grainandgrain.com/2011/02/11/touch-of-funk-dry-stout/#comment-374 Wed, 20 Mar 2013 23:48:14 +0000 http://grainandgrain.com/?p=91#comment-374 Well, the intent of the beer was just to get a hint of the sour, ala Guinness, as opposed to a full on sour. I have done that as well. I am not a huge fan of roast and sour. It is interesting, but not really something that kept me going back. The link to that recipe is below.

http://grainandgrain.com/2011/08/08/sour-stout-brewday/

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Comment on Touch of Funk Dry Stout by drewbeta http://grainandgrain.com/2011/02/11/touch-of-funk-dry-stout/#comment-373 Wed, 20 Mar 2013 21:24:08 +0000 http://grainandgrain.com/?p=91#comment-373 sweet! I did a 100% sour mash for 2 days, and it was SOUR. It mellowed over time, and turned out to be pretty nice. I’ve read methods of doing a partial the way that you did, but you can probably just dump the sour mash into your normal mash on brew day, then sparge and boil as normal. I would bump up the percentage that’s sour, but I wouldn’t leave it to sour as long. good thing that your wife had you boil it because the lacto would have kept feasting and multiplying. It could have been good, but it would probably take a lot longer. good stuff though! I think I’m going to try to make a belgian sour stout type thing, like a dark sour mashed dubble, but with a lower gravity.

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Comment on SMaSH Brews by John http://grainandgrain.com/2011/04/02/smash-brews/#comment-350 Sat, 01 Dec 2012 13:06:28 +0000 http://grainandgrain.com/?p=296#comment-350 That certainly makes sense. I know my experience with Safale 05 has been similar. It has a peachy note, and that is more pronounced when fermented above about 67F.

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Comment on SMaSH Brews by Schuyler Campbell http://grainandgrain.com/2011/04/02/smash-brews/#comment-349 Fri, 30 Nov 2012 16:57:52 +0000 http://grainandgrain.com/?p=296#comment-349 If those two other homebrewers also use no temperature control (or shoot for a 68-70F fermentation like many do), these results make a lot of sense.My experience shows a healthy pitch and a cooler fermentation produce a cleaner beer, which is probably why many craft brewers use English strains of yeast to produce excellent “clean” beers (Deschute’s Brewing uses WLP002/WY1968, for example). It stands to reason that ECY-10 is just a finicky strain that requires dutiful temperature control.

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Comment on SMaSH Brews by John http://grainandgrain.com/2011/04/02/smash-brews/#comment-348 Fri, 30 Nov 2012 11:09:38 +0000 http://grainandgrain.com/?p=296#comment-348 Interesting you had that experience. I did not have temperature control on these fermentations, because I only have one temperature control rig, and that may have played a role. Usually I find fruity/spicy notes when a beer is fermented too warm. These were brewed when the bigger problem is having them warm enough in my basement, but given the fruitness of the Safale 05 strain, they may have been too warm. That being said, I know 2 other homebrewers in my club try ECY #10 independently, and they had similar results. We all came to the same conclusion, and have dropped it from our lineup. Glad to hear you have had a better result.

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Comment on SMaSH Brews by Schuyler Campbell http://grainandgrain.com/2011/04/02/smash-brews/#comment-347 Tue, 27 Nov 2012 19:21:36 +0000 http://grainandgrain.com/?p=296#comment-347 I have used all of the above yeast strains a great deal. In my experience, ECY 10 was very clean and far more flocculant than US-05 (though not so much as S-04). Granted, I fermented with that strain in the high 50′s and low 60′s (as I do with the Chico strain and Pacman). But I found it clean enough for my Black DIPA. Perhaps your fermentation temp was irregular or your yeast wasn’t very healthy?

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Comment on Brew Day — American IPA, 3 Hops, 2 Yeasts, 1 Wort by John http://grainandgrain.com/2012/04/30/brew-day-american-ipa-3-hops-2-yeasts-1-wort/#comment-316 Mon, 25 Jun 2012 10:26:26 +0000 http://grainandgrain.com/?p=955#comment-316 I posted the tasting notes. Can’t find my picutures and got pulled on other projects, but the gist is on the post. Hope this helps.

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Comment on Brew Day — American IPA, 3 Hops, 2 Yeasts, 1 Wort by Mike http://grainandgrain.com/2012/04/30/brew-day-american-ipa-3-hops-2-yeasts-1-wort/#comment-312 Mon, 25 Jun 2012 04:23:53 +0000 http://grainandgrain.com/?p=955#comment-312 Curious to hear what your thoughts were on the final beers. Did 028 work in the IPA?

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